Greater Morristown at the Women’s Marches, Jan. 21, 2017

Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
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Editor’s note: We’ll be sharing images and impressions from Women’s Marches sent by Greater Morristown residents. Send yours here.

 

NINNA ROCO, Women’s March in NYC

These shots of the Women’s March in New York are from Ninna Roco of Morristown:

The Woman's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.
The Woman’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Ninna Roco.

 


CATHY WILSON, Women’s March in NYC.

Cathy Wilson, Morris Township’s Democratic chairwoman, sent this photo from the Women’s March in NYC:

Cathy Wilson, left, and friend at Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Cathy Wilson
Cathy Wilson, left, and friend at Women’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Cathy Wilson

 


MICHAEL AARON ROCKLAND, Women’s March in DC.

Morristown author Michael Aaron Rockland and his wife Patricia Ard shared this photo from the Washington march:

Michael Aaron Rockland and his wife Patricia Ard of Morristown at the Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Michael Rockland
Michael Aaron Rockland and his wife Patricia Ard of Morristown at the Women’s March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Michael Rockland

 

 


THE REV. CYNTHIA BLACK, Women’s March in DC.

The Rev. Cynthia Black, rector of Morristown’s Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, chartered a bus that took about 50 people to the Washington march:

We had a fantastic time. The crowds were huge, but amazingly respectful, helpful and polite.

Marchers prepared to leave Morristown's Church of the Redeemer at crack of dawn for march on Washington. Photo by the Rev. Cynthia Black
Marchers prepared to leave Morristown’s Church of the Redeemer at crack of dawn for march on Washington. Photo by the Rev. Cynthia Black
Becky Walker and her partner, Morristown Rev. Cynthia Black, at Women's March in DC. Photo courtesy of Cynthia Black
Becky Walker and her partner, Morristown Rev. Cynthia Black, at Women’s March in DC. Photo courtesy of Cynthia Black

 


JUDITH STEIN-LOWENTHAL,  Women’s March in DC.

Judy Stein-Lowenthal, a mother of two from Morris Township, marched in DC with her two sisters:

It was an inspiring experience being a part of an overwhelming number of people who are speaking up for so many diverse issues that I care about and that are threatened by the policies of this administration.

The signs people carried were clever, humorous, and bold. People were energized by each other, erupting in a chorus of cheers or chants: “What does democracy look like…this is what democracy looks like.”

Some were really funny: “We need a leader, not a creepy tweeter,” and “Hands too small can’t build walls.”

Another: “Hey, hey, we’re not going away, welcome to your first day.”

Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women’s March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal

Slideshow photos by Judy Stein-Lowenthal:

Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
Women's March in DC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Judy Stein-Lowenthal
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TODD OLSTED, Women’s March in New York

Todd Olsted of Denville shared these images from the NYC march:

Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
Women’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted

Slideshow photos by Todd Olsted:

Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Todd Olsted
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ALEXANDRA MONFALCONE, Women’s March in New York

Alexandra Monfalcone is a Morristown High School senior who is active in MHS Theatre. She also is a MorristownGreen.com correspondent:

A beautiful Susan B. Anthony sign floated through the Women’s March in NYC on January 21st. To the surprise of many, the woman holding that sign was Tina Fey.  Other celebrities who attended the march included Helen Mirren and Whoopi Goldberg, who made their opinions known.

An estimated throng of more than 400,000 people crowded Fifth Avenue, marching in the name of women’s rights. Men, women, and children came together in an exceptionally empowering and peaceful display of their First Amendment right.

The first round of marchers set out at 11 am, and organized waves followed until 4 pm. In addition to the myriad of posters on display, there were people with drums, tambourines, and even entire marching bands joining the protest.

People chanted exuberantly throughout the entire march. One of the most popular chants echoing through the masses began with the women shouting, “My body my choice,” to which the men responded: “Her body her choice.”

Another frequent chant: “You’re orange, you’re gross, you lost the popular vote!”

The turnout greatly exceeded expectations, and the NYPD did a spectacular job ensuring the march was organized and safe. Many families with small children showed up to teach their kids the power they possess, simply with their voice.

All of the children — from infants to middle schoolers — were kept out of harm’s way and had a blast. Two parents gave their children a ride on their shoulders, so that they could have a fantastic vantage point. The two girls held signs that they created, which read: “Full of Potential!”

The march on NYC was certainly a testament to the energy and drive that American women posses, and more importantly, the power people have when they vocalize their opinions. In a time when hope appears to be at an all-time low, the Women’s March on NYC proved that together, we can make it at an all-time high.

Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women’s March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone

Slideshow photos by Alexandra Monfalcone:

Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
Women's March on NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandra Monfalcone
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EMMA PIASCIK, Trenton march

Emma Piascik is a Morristown High School senior who plays trumpet in the North Jersey Area Band.

Around 7,500 men and women occupied the streets of Trenton yesterday afternoon at the Women’s March to protect their rights as citizens of the United States of America.  Organized by Elizabeth Meyer, the event began with several empowering speeches at the Trenton War Memorial, followed by marching to the steps of the Statehouse, shouting chants such as “build bridges, NOT walls!” and “bigotry has got to go!”

Rather than protesting Donald Trump’s presidency, this march focused on fighting for available birth control and abortions, all that Planned Parenthood offers to women, and maintaining the rights that women generations before have fought for tirelessly.

As marcher Joanne Brown stated: “Our rights as women are in danger. Our reproductive rights. And I don’t ever want my daughter [right here] to EVER have to march again.”  Those who marched also spoke against bigotry, racism, misogyny, and homophobia, as shown by signs that stated “liberty and justice for ALL.”

While bringing all of these important subjects to light, the underlying message at the event was for all citizens to unite and take action.  The keynote speaker at the Trenton Women’s March, Edith Savage-Jennings, lifted the crowd with her speech in front of the Statehouse, exclaiming “you have united today, and I beg that you stay united.”  

Savage-Jennings fought and continues to fight for civil rights, participating in sit-ins beginning when she was 14 and working closely with Martin Luther King, befriending one of her best friends, Coretta Scott-King, along the way.  She stressed that “the White House is not a palace, it is a people’s house,” making it crucial that citizens demand representation.

Trenton, one of many cities that organized to fight for women’s rights, held a successfully peaceful protest, helping to build a strong bridge and destroy a dividing wall.

Listening to Edith Savage-Jennings speak on the steps of the Statehouse, at the Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik
Listening to Edith Savage-Jennings speak on the steps of the Statehouse, at the Women’s March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik
The Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik
The Women’s March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik

 

Thousands of men and women on the streets of Trenton at the Women's March, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik
Thousands of men and women on the streets of Trenton at the Women’s March, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Emma Piascik

MARLENE MARTELL, Trenton march

Marlene Martell, a teacher at the Sussex Avenue School in Morris Township, shared this photo from the Trenton march:

The Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Marlene Martell
The Women’s March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Marlene Martell

 


JAMES AND STEFFI STEVENSONWomen’s March in New York.

In 1970, James and Steffi Stevenson marched together in Washington to protest the Vietnam War. This weekend, the Morristown couple took to the streets of New York for the Women’s March.

THEN & NOW: James & Steffi Stevenson marching against the Vietnam War in 1970, and marching for women's rights in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photos courtesy of the Stevensons.
THEN & NOW: James & Steffi Stevenson marching against the Vietnam War in 1970, and marching for women’s rights in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photos courtesy of the Stevensons.
At the Morristown train station, prior to Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Jim Stevenson
At the Morristown train station, prior to Women’s March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Jim Stevenson

Slideshow photos courtesy of James Stevenson

THEN & NOW: James & Steffi Stevenson marching against the Vietnam War in 1970, and marching for women's rights in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photos courtesy of the Stevensons.
Steffi & Jim Stevenson of Morristown at Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of the Stevensons
'PUTIN'S PUPPET' sign at Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
'NOT MY PRESIDENT' sign at Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Demonstrator for immigration rights at Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Lesbian/ Gay Band at Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
Love vs. Hate, at Women's march in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Jim Stevenson
At the Morristown train station, prior to Women's March in NYC, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Jim Stevenson
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MICHELLE DUPREE HARRIS, Trenton march

Michelle Dupree Harris is a Morristown Councilwoman and a schoolteacher.  She attended the Trenton march.

The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women’s March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Michelle Dupree Harris

Slideshow photos by Michelle Dupree Harris:

The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy by Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Michelle Dupree Harris
The Women's March on Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Michelle Dupree Harris
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HELEN ARNOLD, Trenton march.

Helen Arnold of Morristown is a community activist and longtime member of the Morris County NAACP and Urban League chapters.  She felt compelled to march in Trenton, she said, to demand equal pay for women, and child care programs–and to send a message to President Trump:

“I think people need to let him know that people are dissatisfied across the nation, with the rhetoric, the garbage that spewed out of people. The money trickles from the top, and it appears that it’s going nowhere but the top.

“I’m afraid for young people, and for how other countries are perceiving the United States of America,” Arnold said.

 

Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women’s March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold

Slideshow photos by Helen Arnold, from the Women’s March in Trenton:

Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
Women's March in Trenton, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Helen Arnold
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LESLIE RAFF of Morristown, Pompton Plains march

Girls wear Pussyhat Project beanies at Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Girls wear Pussyhat Project beanies at Women’s March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff

Slideshow photos by Leslie Raff.

Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
Women's March in Pompton Plains, Jan. 21, 2017. Photo by Leslie Raff
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SUSAN HUBBARD, New York march

Susan Hubbard of Morris Township is a novelist who teaches at the County College of Morris and volunteers at the Community Soup Kitchen.  She said she marched in New York to make a statement:

“Trump has a history of believing his own lies. He seems to think he won the election in a landslide. I think it’s important to remind him that the majority of Americans don’t support his agenda,” Hubbard said. 

Susan Hubbard, left, marching in New York. Photo courtesy of Susan Hubbard
Susan Hubbard, left, marching in New York. Photo courtesy of Susan Hubbard
The Women's March in New York. Photo by Susan Hubbard
The Women’s March in New York. Photo by Susan Hubbard

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5 COMMENTS

  1. The participation from our very own area is inspiring and I’ll share my own photos from the March in NYC. How can we get this group together to unite in not only future marches but also ways to combat some of the intolerable actions the administration had already taken? I am feeling helpless watching what is quietly happening and would like to understand how we can influence changet for the better.

  2. We are like the Stevensons! Except that we weren’t together in 1970. But we were both in jail and met soon after that!

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