Canadian TV interviews Morris Township minister at Standing Rock

The Rev. Alison Miller speaks to the CBC near Sioux reservation in North Dakota.
The Rev. Alison Miller speaks to the CBC near Sioux reservation in North Dakota.
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The Rev. Alison Miller speaks to the CBC near Sioux reservation in North Dakota.
The Rev. Alison Miller speaks to the CBC near Sioux reservation in North Dakota.

Alison Miller, minister of the Morristown Unitarian Fellowship in Morris Township, was interviewed at Cannon Ball, N.D., by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. on Sunday.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline, which the tribe says would jeopardize its water supply and desecrate sacred ancestral lands. The $3.7 billion pipeline is intended to send up to 550,000 barrels of oil per day from North Dakota oilfields to an Illinois terminal.

WATCH THE VIDEO INTERVIEW

“We don’t just have a right to come in and do what we want,” Miller told the CBC, citing an 1851 treaty.

The Sioux appeared to have won a victory over the weekend when the Army announced that its Corps of Engineers would seek an alternate route for the pipeline.

However, President-elect Donald Trump, a stockholder in the company building the nearly 1,200-mile pipeline that traverses four states, has expressed support for completion of the project.

Scenes of protesters being tear-gassed and sprayed with freezing water have attracted international attention. Authorities have defended their actions as necessary to quell riots by demonstrators.

“We need to respect one another,”  Miller, who  seeks election to head the national Unitarian Universalist Association, told the CBC.

“This is about caring deeply about the well being of our earth well into the future,”  she said.

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