Last chance to visit the Wick House; summer repairs start May 20

The Wick House at Jockey Hollow. Photo by Jeff Sovelove
The Wick House at Jockey Hollow. Photo by Jeff Sovelove
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The Wick House at Jockey Hollow. Photo by Jeff Sovelove
The Wick House at Jockey Hollow. Photo by Jeff Sovelove

Hey kids, better get on your horse if you want to see the house where Tempe Wick hid hers!

A re-enactor takes a break inside the Wick House at Jockey Hollow, during the third annual Revolutionary Times Weekend. Photo by Carol Barkin
A re-enactor takes a break inside the Wick House at Jockey Hollow, during the third annual Revolutionary Times Weekend in 2011. Photo by Carol Barkin

The Morristown National Historical Park will close the popular Wick House for the summer on May 20, 2015, to perform rehab work on the chimney and fireplace of the circa-1750 structure.  The rest of Jockey Hollow, including the Wick Garden, will remain open to the public.

Legend has it that a young Tempe Wick hid her horse inside a small bedroom when mutineers came prowling during the Hard Winter of 1780.

Here is more from the National Park Service:

Wick House Chimney & Fireplace Rehabilitation to Begin:
Historic Building Will Close for the Summer

Morristown, NJ – Morristown National Historical Park’s circa 1750 Wick House will close for the summer on May 20th, 2015, in order to conduct much-needed rehabilitation work on its chimney and fireplace. All of Jockey Hollow and the grounds around the Wick House, including the Wick Garden, will remain open to the public during the rehabilitation. Safety zones will be set up in the area immediate surrounding the house to ensure visitors’ safety.

The New England and Long Island inspired style house belonged to Henry Wick, the biggest landowner in Morristown, whose property included approximately 1400 acres. At least four brigades of the Continental Army, and possibly parts of two other brigades, camped on Wick’s land during the winter of 1779-1780. The troops cut down at least 600 acres of Wick’s trees to build their huts and to use as firewood. Wick also allowed Major General Arthur St. Clair to rent rooms in his home during the encampment.

The home remained a private residence until 1933, when Morristown National Historical Park was created and the house was donated to the new park. From 1934-1935, the National Park Service restored the house as a New Deal, Public Works Administration project.

 

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