Video: What parents should know about asthma, from Morristown Medical Center

Dr. April Wazeka specializes in children's respiratory disorders at Morristown Medical Center. Photo by Kevin Coughlin
Dr. April Wazeka specializes in children's respiratory disorders at Morristown Medical Center. Photo by Kevin Coughlin
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Anyone who has grown up with asthma knows the frightening feeling. It’s like having a python wrapped around your chest, squeezing tighter every time you exhale until you are gasping for breath.

Dr. April Wazeka specializes in children's respiratory disorders at Morristown Medical Center. Photo by Kevin Coughlin
Dr. April Wazeka specializes in children's respiratory disorders at Morristown Medical Center. Photo by Kevin Coughlin

Unfortunately, this is not an exclusive club. Ten to 12 percent of American children suffer from asthma, and the figure approaches 40 percent in some urban areas, according to Dr. April Wazeka, a pediatric pulmonologist at the Respiratory Center for Children at the Goryeb Children’s Hospital in Morristown. And asthma is growing more prevalent, she said at a recent press briefing.

The good news is that improved inhalers are bringing relief to many people with asthma. New screening techniques are helping match patients with the most effective medications for them. And schools are becoming better at accommodating the special needs of children with this chronic condition, Dr. Wazeka said.

In this short video, Dr. Wazeka answers questions about:

  • Common triggers for asthma attacks
  • Prospects for genetic therapies to eradicate asthma
  • Simple steps to make schools friendlier for asthma sufferers, from eliminating bus idling to air-conditioning classrooms.
  • Children’s chances of “outgrowing” asthma
  • Whether asthmatic children should play sports

 

 

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1 COMMENT

  1. As a patient education specialist, I often hear many concerns and frustrations especially from parents who have children with asthma. They are trying to balance their concerns about letting their child engage in active play and sports, uncovering the most common triggers, making sure they are not over medicated, and most importantly, keeping their asthma under control and their child out of the emergency room. They are unsure and nervous what “I’m feeling okay mom” really means. I think it’s important when ever possible to let patients know there is help out there and it doesn’t require dispensing more medication. Spiro PD is truly the world’s first personal spirometer which empowers patients and caregivers to monitor lung function anytime and anywhere, at work, school, vacation, play, and more. Spiro PD has an intuitive color touch screen and is extremely easy to use and understand. Patients and caregivers can now track lung function over days, weeks, months or even years if desired. The information from Spiro PD can be uploaded to the computer with a USB and emailed directly to the doctor. Spiro PD measures FEV1, FVC, the ratio of FEV1 to FVC, FEF25-75, Flow-Volume Loop and Volume-Time Curve. With all of these measurements, patients will have a complete picture of their lung function. Spiro PD meets ATS standards, and is cleared by the FDA for home use. Spiro PD can alert parents of a declining lung function before their child begins to feel symptoms. This early detection will help to prevent asthma attacks, trips to the emergency room and over medicated patients. It also helps patients begin to identify the triggers and warning signs of an impending asthma attack. Spiro PD empowers patients and parents and enables them to have a lot more confidence in making educated decisions about potential activity. No more guessing and no more worrying if it’s okay to play or not. Spiro PD is priced at $219, which for most people pays for itself if it prevents just one emergency room visit. For more information please visit http://www.spiropd.com , Twitter http://www.twitter.com/spiropd, or Facebook http://www.facebook.com/spiropd.

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